Samsung GSAT Test

As a fun little experience and because I need a job/source of income anyways, I decided to take the Global Samsung Aptitude Test (GSAT) for new business/marketing candidates. This is the 2nd stage of their 4 step employment process, the first submitting your materials including resume and work experience, and the other two being interviews with different executives and HR.

You can apply here:  http://apply.samsung.co.kr/rec/apply/EngResumeServlet ,but you can only apply twice a year to my knowledge. You can also check out their job board(Korean) to find out if they are going through their hiring season, and also find higher positions that may have different hiring procedures.

Once you pass the first stage, you are given a test slip indicating your test location, room, and exact seat. Mine was at Sincheon Middle School.

samsung test slip

As said in the test slip, you only need your test slip, ID, marker (that can be scanned by a computer), and correction tape to cover your mistakes. Having never used this marker, I didn’t quite understand what they meant. I ended up finding out last minute that it was a special marker that you can buy at a convenience store. They’re typically called computer pens (컴퓨터 펜).

Test Marker for Korean standardized tests
Something I’ve never seen in my life until yesterday.

If you forgot any supplies, there were some enterprising ajumma (older women) and ajussi (older men) selling drinks, pens, and anything else you would need outside of the gates. In my case, the proctors even had some pens and correction tape to lend.

Vendors Samsung Test
Vendors selling items outside of the gate.
Samsung Test Front Gate
More suits than the President’s office.

The event was pretty organized with signs outside of the station and staff to help direct you. It was quite a weird feeling to be in a classroom, and as luck would have it my spot was right in front with the teacher’s desk wedged right over mine. I felt like the floor plan was terrible. The proctors weren’t terribly practiced as they didn’t seem to know how to proceed. All instructions were sent through the school’s PA system. While waiting to start the test, they thought it was a good idea to play classical music really loud which obviously wasn’t a good idea.

Samsung Test Classroom
I’ve always wanted to go to school in Korea. Guess I got half my wish!
Samsung Role Sheet
Organized seating. The diagram is no way representative of how little space the people in the front get as you can see.
Samsung Test Seat
The worse seat in the house.

As a foreigner with very limited Korean speaking abilities, I struggled to find any study materials and finally decided to just take it cold turkey. I did find some materials which turned out to be for engineers and were highly irrelevant for my test. The test consisted of three categories, quantitative reasoning, logical reasoning, and visualization. Granted, I’ve never done anything related to standardized testing in 9 or so years, so I had my work cut out for me. Unfortunately, I don’t have any photos of the tests for obvious reasons, but I will do my best to explain them.

Quantitative Reasoning

These were your typical math puzzle questions taken during middle and high school. They would’ve been stupidly easy, say if I did these 13 years ago. Unfortunately, yesterday wasn’t 13 years ago and I was literally struggling to do basic equations. A typical question would be something like “Person A and person B run to point C at the same time. Person A runs 5kph and reaches point C in 24 minutes. Person B reaches the point C 6 minutes later. How fast was Person B running?”.

I ended up having to relearn the math as I went, which was actually refreshingly fun, until I heard the 3 minutes remaining announcement while on question 8. Unfortunately they only gave me 30 minutes to do the 20 questions and I ended up only completing 9. It really crushed my spirit, and I know had I been given just one day of preparation I would’ve done a lot better.

Logical Reasoning

I vaguely remember taking these in school, but they were pretty hard  as I couldn’t remember a methodical method to solve them. I think they gave me 20 minutes to answer 20 questions. A typical question gave you  5 people, A,B,C,D,E, mixed with 5 houses A,B,C,D,E, with each person being 1 year apart. Then they would add conditions such as A is older than C, but younger than D, and C doesn’t live in D or B. You would then have to figure out which of 5 scenarios were impossible, and etc. I believe it involved a lot of combination reasoning, but at the time I couldn’t streamline the process. I also ended up only doing about half of the problems.

Visualization Test

This was the real ridiculous one as I don’t think I’ve ever taken a test quite like this before. I don’t know if it was because I was in an Asian country, but they had tests that involved origami. Basically you would be presented with a square sheet of paper with diagrams of dotted lines over the paper indicating if it was folded inward/outward or was folded either or. Then they would present you with 5 diagrams and ask you what the backside would look like or which one the backside wouldn’t look like. At this point I was just ready for the PA to say stop.

Samsung Test example
Then you would have to guess which diagram out of 5 was not possible. At this point I just wanted to go home.

While probably not one of the most pleasant experiences, I am left with a bittersweet taste. It really was quite refreshing to use those parts of my brain again, but at the same time I’m very disappointed in how much easier the test would have been if I had been given just one day to go over all these types of problems as they weren’t terribly hard (minus the visualizations). It’s definitely been quite a culture shock and I hope my experience may help those looking to work for Samsung and find information on this obscure test as I couldn’t find much info on it.

Have you taken this test before? Do you have any interesting experiences trying to get a job in Korea? Let me know through email or in the comments below!

 

 

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Author: Ryan Mar

Just a guy simply making the most with life abroad. Love travel, photography, food, and just enjoying life. Currently blogging about beautiful places in Seoul, Korea, along with food, culture, and observations at findingtheseoul.com.

18 thoughts on “Samsung GSAT Test”

  1. Thank you! I am taking the GSAT in Korea soon and can hardly find any tips or materials on it. I at least wanted an idea of the types of questions so that I can search for similar practice questions from different sources. That’s exactly what your feedback did for me. Did you pass? How did you do? I hope all is well now.

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    1. Hi Victoria, I was on the same boat, and I’m glad my blog helped you a bit. Unfortunately, I didn’t pass, but hope it works out for you if it’s what you want! At least you’re more prepared than I was 🙂

      Like

  2. Hi Ryan Mar,

    Hope you are doing well and thank you for sharing your experience..

    I am going to take GSAT by this Sunday. Can you help me by giving that material for engineers.

    It will be helpful for me.

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    1. Hello Pandian,
      Unfortunately, I don’t have any materials for engineers, but I do know they have more technical questions regarding technology and simple electronic questions. I took the marketing GSAT, so I’m not sure what you can expect.
      Best of luck!

      Ryan

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  3. Thanks! I took the exam and have yet to hear whether I passed. I did fairly well on the logic and visual sections but not so much for the quantitative part. 😦 For the quantitative, 20% (or the first six questions) are actual math word problems, and the rest of the 14 questions are graph and data interpretation questions. People, DO NOT waste your time on the math questions, like I unfortunately did. Go do the graph questions first then come back and do as many math questions as time permits. Only 30 min!
    Also, on the day before the exam I ended up finding an online video class on this website: http://ecareer.co.kr
    Everything is in Korean and even the 3-hour video is done in Korean but all of the problems are written in English. If you know some Korean and desperately want some practice, I would sign up for it.
    Good luck to everybody searching the internet for help with GSAT! Thanks again Ryan!

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  4. Hi Ryan, very helpful of you. I want to ask, how many days before the D-day did you received the Test Slip? Because there are 5 days left for the exam and they haven’t sent me one.

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    1. Hi! I think the math was pretty straightforward to the point where we didn’t need them, but maybe just bring one and see if it’s allowed. I don’t quite remember if they were allowed or not. Let us know!

      Like

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